Thu, Apr 27, 2017

Prop Me Up Please

1 Kings 22:29-53  “Prop Me Up Please!”

 

 

Issues at hand:

1.   One King’s arrogance that leads to a great downfall

2.   One King’s humility that leads to a great Grace

 

29 So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramoth Gilead.

30 And the king of Israel (Ahab) said to Jehoshaphat, “I will disguise myself and go into battle; but you put on your robes.” So the king of Israel disguised himself and went into battle.

·      Ahab was painting a target on Jehoshaphat

o  I’ll wear armor but you wear a robe – OK?

·      How was it possible that Jehoshaphat didn’t see through this lie?

o  Do you believe everything people tell you just to be nice?

o  Is this how Jesus would have responded?

Psalm 12:2  They speak falseness to each other.

With flattering lips, with a double heart they speak.

 

·      The robes that Jehoshaphat is to wear are his “royal garments” (gnt), mentioned earlier in verse 10.   [1]

 

31 Now the king of Syria had commanded the thirty-two captains of his chariots, saying, “Fight with no one small or large, but only with the king of Israel.”

32 So it was, when the captains of the chariots saw Jehoshaphat, that they said, “Surely it is the king of Israel!”

Therefore they turned aside to fight against him, and Jehoshaphat cried out.

33 And it happened, when the captains of the chariots saw that it was not the king of Israel, that they turned back from pursuing him.

·      Did Ahab know they’d be gunning for him alone?

o  Many ancient battles were centered around killing the King

o  Kings were always expected to go into battle – Top warriors often became King (or led coups).

 

·      50/20 Vision:

Genesis 50:20    But as for you, you meant evil against me;

but God meant it for good, in order to bring it about as it is this day,

to save many people alive.

 

·      Jehoshaphat was a godly King and led revival in Judah

o  The Lord will always protect His own beloved – those loyal to Him.

2 Chronicles 19:4    So Jehoshaphat dwelt at Jerusalem; and he went out again among the people from Beersheba to the mountains of Ephraim, and brought them back to the Lord God of their fathers.

 

34 But a certain man drew his bow fully (lit. “with all his strength”) and struck the king of Israel between the armor scales and the breastplate; so he said to his chariot driver, “Turn the chariot and bring me out from the camp, for I am wounded.”  [2]

·      A certain man is a very decisive expression in the word of God. In this place it was the very man commissioned of the Lord; for the Lord hath strung the bow, directed to the mark, and found out Ahab amidst all his disguise, and a way to his heart in spite of all his armor. Alas! how could he think to escape when God pronounced his sentence?  [3]

o  Possibly Naaman?

2 Kings 5:1

1 Now Naaman, commander of the army of the king of Syria, was a great and honorable man in the eyes of his master, because by him the Lord had given victory to Syria. He was also a mighty man of valor, but a leper.

·      Other translations that express the intended meaning include “at random” (reb, nab), “randomly” (nlt), and “without any special aim” (njb).  [4]

 

Just to recap:

1.   A certain man

2.   Drawing his bow at random

3.   With no special aim – not aiming at anyone particularly

4.   Pulls his bow back with all his strength

5.   Striking the King of Israel in the exact point between his breastplate and his armor scales

 

35 The battle intensified on that day, and the king was being propped up in the chariot opposite Aram, but he died in the evening, and the blood of the wound ran out to the floor of the chariot.  [5]

·      Prop up the loser – how many men prop themselves up with their surroundings so as to present a deeper lie?

 

36 Then, as the sun was going down, a shout went throughout the army, saying, “Every man to his city, and every man to his own country!”

37 So the king died, and was brought to Samaria.

And they buried the king in Samaria.

38 Then someone washed the chariot at a pool in Samaria,

and the dogs licked up his blood while the harlots bathed,

according to the word of the Lord which He had spoken.

·      Ahab comes back to Samaria dead – no peace in the death of the unbeliever.

1 Kings 22:27-28    and say, ‘Thus says the Ahab, the king: “Put this fellow in prison, and feed him with the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, until I come in peace.” ’ ”

28 But Micaiah said, “If you ever return in peace, the Lord has not spoken by me.” And he said, “Take heed, all you people!”

 

39 Now the rest of the acts of Ahab, and all that he did, the ivory house which he built and all the cities that he built, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

40 So Ahab rested with his fathers.

Then Ahaziah his son reigned in his place.

·      Ivory House

·      Cities that he built

·      All of Ahab’s accomplishments

o  Meant NOTHING to God.

Ecclesiastes 1:14–15   (NLT)  [6]

 

14 I observed everything going on under the sun, and really, it is all meaningless—like chasing the wind.

15 What is wrong cannot be made right. What is missing cannot be recovered.

 

41 Jehoshaphat the son of Asa had become king over Judah in the fourth year of Ahab king of Israel.

42 Jehoshaphat was thirty-five years old when he became king, and he reigned twenty-five years in Jerusalem. His mother’s name was Azubah the daughter of Shilhi.

43 And he walked in all the ways of his father Asa. He did not turn aside from them, doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord. Nevertheless the high places were not taken away, for the people offered sacrifices and burned incense on the high places.

44 Also Jehoshaphat made peace with the king of Israel.

45 Now the rest of the acts of Jehoshaphat, the might that he showed, and how he made war, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?

46 And the rest of the perverted persons, who remained in the days of his father Asa, he banished from the land.

·      Perverted persons?

1 Kings 22.46  (LEB) [7]  The remainder of the male shrine prostitutes who were left over in the days of Asa his father he exterminated from the land.

 

47 There was then no king in Edom, only a deputy of the king.

48 Jehoshaphat made merchant ships to go to Ophir for gold; but they never sailed, for the ships were wrecked at Ezion Geber.

 

 

49 Then Ahaziah the son of Ahab said to Jehoshaphat, “Let my servants go with your servants in the ships.” But Jehoshaphat would not.

50 And Jehoshaphat rested with his fathers, and was buried with his fathers in the City of David his father. Then Jehoram his son reigned in his place.

·      Jehoshaphat had enough of Northern Israel and their paganism.

o  Jehoshaphat knew God’s favor was not with them.

51 Ahaziah the son of Ahab became king over Israel in Samaria in the seventeenth year of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, and reigned two years over Israel.

52 He did evil in the sight of the Lord, and walked in the way of his father and in the way of his mother and in the way of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who had made Israel sin;

53 for he served Baal and worshiped him, and provoked the Lord God of Israel to anger, according to all that his father had done.

·      Further legacy of paganism and disloyalty to the God of Israel.

o  God’s blessing and favor will not remain with those that turn away from Him.

 


 

Further Notes

22:26-28

·      Observe the cruelty of Ahab. Hard fare and coarse food, poor requitals for faithfulness. But how much sweeter to Micaiah all this than the rich fare of Jezebel’s table with the impending ruin. The Apostle Paul’s prison must have been a blessed place when the Holy Ghost was so much with him as to enable him to send forth that charming Epistle to the church at Philippi, which he wrote in his confinement at Rome. And John found cause to bless the hour of his banishment to Patmos, which brought him such a visitor as the Lord Jesus.    [8]

 

22:30–33

·      There seems to have been a good deal of art in Ahab’s thus disguising himself, and advising Jehoshaphat to go in his robes. It is probable that he had heard of the king of Syria’s command to his generals, to fight only with the king of Israel. And as the person of Ahab was not known to those generals, it is very probable that Ahab pleased himself with the idea that the robes of Jehoshaphat would expose him, and his own disguise conceal himself. So that Ahab, if so, was as defective in friendship to Jehoshaphat, as in duty to the Lord. And no doubt, he that is false to God can never be true to man. The danger of Jehoshaphat, no doubt, taught him that he was out of the path of duty. In the parallel history in the Book of the Chronicles, we are told somewhat more particularly of this situation and conduct of the king of Judah. For there it is said that when the Syrians compassed him around to kill him, and he cried out, the Lord helped him, and God moved them to depart from him. And that when Jehoshaphat returned to his own home after the battle, the son of Hanani, the seer, who went out to meet him, reproved him for having gone to the help of the ungodly; and that therefore the wrath of the Lord was upon him. See 2 Chron. 18:31 and ch. 19:1, 2.  [9]

 

22:35

·      758 אֲרָם, אֲרַם מַעֲכָה [ʾAram /arawm/] n pr m. From the same as 759; TWOT 163; GK 806 and 807; 132 occurrences; AV translates as “Syria” 67 times, “Syrians” 56 times, “Aram” seven times, “Syriadamascus + 4601” once, and “Syriamaachah + 4601” once. 1 Aram or Syria the nation. 2 the Syrian or Aramean people. 3 fifth son of Shem. 4 a grandson of Nahor. 5 a descendant of Asher. Additional Information: Aram or Arameans = “exalted”.    [10] 

 

22:36

·      Every man to his country: The Israelite army consisted of men from both the northern kingdom and the southern kingdom. Their safe return is in agreement with Micaiah’s prophecy in verse 17, which is “let each return to his home in peace.”  [11]



[1] Donald Slager, “Preface,” in A Handbook on 1 & 2 Kings, ed. Paul Clarke et al., vol. 1–2, United Bible Societies’ Handbooks (New York: United Bible Societies, 2008), 673.

[2] W. Hall Harris III et al., eds., The Lexham English Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012), 1 Ki 22:34.

[3] Robert Hawker, Poor Man’s Old Testament Commentary: 1 Kings–Esther, vol. 3 (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2013), 149–150.

[4] Donald Slager, “Preface,” in A Handbook on 1 & 2 Kings, ed. Paul Clarke et al., vol. 1–2, United Bible Societies’ Handbooks (New York: United Bible Societies, 2008), 676.

[5] W. Hall Harris III et al., eds., The Lexham English Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012), 1 Ki 22:35.

[6] Tyndale House Publishers, Holy Bible: New Living Translation (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2013), 1 Ki 22:30–31.

[7] W. Hall Harris III et al., eds., The Lexham English Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012), 1 Ki 22:46.

[8] Robert Hawker, Poor Man’s Old Testament Commentary: 1 Kings–Esther, vol. 3 (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2013), 148.

[9] Robert Hawker, Poor Man’s Old Testament Commentary: 1 Kings–Esther, vol. 3 (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2013), 149.

[10] James Strong, Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon (Woodside Bible Fellowship, 1995).

[11] Donald Slager, “Preface,” in A Handbook on 1 & 2 Kings, ed. Paul Clarke et al., vol. 1–2, United Bible Societies’ Handbooks (New York: United Bible Societies, 2008), 678.

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